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Sculpture

Living plant sculptures at the montreal botanical gardens

living plant sculptures at the montreal botanical gardens

living plant sculptures at the montreal botanical gardens

 From Designboom 
living plant sculptures at the montreal botanical gardens
all images © guy boily

mosaicultures internationales montréal 2013
montreal botanical gardens, quebec
now through september 29, 2013

a horticulture competition featuring over 40 living plant sculptures is exhibiting at the montreal botanical gardens in canada. ‘mosaicultures internationales montréal 2013’ displays two and three dimensional constructions, cultivated by 200 international horticultural artists originating from more than 20 countries, making it the largest eco-responsible event to come to quebec. mosaiculture is a multifaceted discipline, drawing on a range of craftsmanship and knowledge — sculpture for the framework, painting for chroma, and ecology, for the understanding of the maintenance of the floral medium. this year’s event challenged the artists around the theme ‘land of hope’ as it reflects their own culture, drawing influences from icons of peace and promise for a environmentally sound world. collectively, over three million colorful flowers and plants were used in the environmental designs, creating a colossal body of living vibrant art.
mosaicultures internationales montréal 2013
video courtesy of mosaicultures internationales montréal 2013


‘a true story’ presented by shanghai, china


‘planting plane trees to attract the phoenix’ presented by beijing, china


‘a dove for peace’ presented by hiroshima, japan


‘the man who planted trees’ presented by mosaicultures internationales de montréal


‘gypsy or gaia?’ presented by gaziantep, turkey


the making of the horticulture sculptures

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Giardino dei Tarocchi

From Land8 by Shavawn Coleman

 

When most people think of Italy, their first thoughts are of the Colosseum, the Vatican, or Venice’s Grand Canal. Not many imagine a colorful, imaginative, unique sculpture garden tucked away in Tuscany.

My first impression upon arriving was just WOW! This was not like the typical gardens I had been visiting all summer. I was engulfed with bright colors, intricate mosaic work, and enormous sculptures. The winding paths kept me intrigued as to what might be around the next corner. I was in Niki de Saint Phalle’s dream!

The Giardino dei Tarocchi (Tarot Card Garden) is about 2 hours north of Rome. Being based on Tarot Cards, this isn’t your typical Italian garden. The designer, Niki de Saint Phalle started the layout and design of the garden in 1978 and opened it to the public in 1998. De Saint Phalle was a French sculptor best known for her large, voluptuous, and colorful statues exhibited all over the world.  She worked and lived on the site of the Tarot Card Garden until her until her death in 2002.

 

High Priestess and Magician

One of the first sculptures to capture your attention is based on the High Priestess Card. This work represents feminine intuition, which, according to the tarot, is one of the ‘keys’ to wisdom. On top of the High Priestess is the Magician. According to de Saint Phalle’s website, “The magician is the card of God the creator of the universe. It is he that created the marvelous joke of our paradoxical world. It is the card of active intelligence, pure light, pure energy, mischief and creation” (http://www.nikidesaintphalle.com/).

 See more


gurunsi earth houses of burkina faso

From designboom


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © scott worthington

 

 

the small country of burkina faso near the border to ghana may not have many resources or economic wealth, but with the plentiful raw materials
available the kassena people make some of the most culturally rich and architecturally beautiful villages, such as this one in tiébélé, built using
traditional gurunsi vernacular. the dwellings occupy a community of just over one hectare in area, and are made of a sun-dried mix of clay, soil,
straw and cow droppings moistened to a perfect mortar, mixed by foot to create strong pottery-like structures. these techniques actually preceded
the well known mud-brick constructions of indigenous peoples in the area. layer upon layer are added when needed, maintaining the necessary wall
thickness to withstand rainstorms and extreme temperatures. short walls are used as urban landscaping elements, provide a buttressing support,
and offer supplementary places to sit or work.

 

the most amazing feature, however, is the intricate ornamentation that covers almost every square inch of the dwellings, painted with colored mud
and chalk that tell an expressive story of the ancient tribe’s culture. the motifs can illustrate just about anything from objects used in normal daily life,
to religion and beliefs, to decorative patterns that distinguish one house from the other. the artwork is then embossed with rocks and etchings that
highlight the designs and give a truly unique character. the material, along with small openings usually located closer to the ground assist in comfortable
interior temperatures. the construction is made with abundant resources found on site that can be re-applied endlessly.

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © scott worthington

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © rita willaert

 

 


kassena village, tiébélé, burkina faso
image © scott worthington

 


Fort de Roovere Trench Bridge by Ro&Ad Architects

Intelligent response to a question of context  from Contemporist

Ro&Ad Architects designed the Trench Bridge at Fort de Roovere in Halsteren, The Netherlands.

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A bridge was needed to be built to allow visitors to cross over the moat of this historical attraction, but the architects found it strange to create a bridge over the canal of a defensive fortification, especially because the bridge needed to be built on the side where traditionally the enemy was expected. Therefore, the architects created a bridge that from a distance is invisible, and has less impact on the historical nature of the fortress than a typical bridge would.

Visit the Ro&Ad Architects website – here.


Cloud Cities by Tomás Saraceno

From the Contemporist

Artist Tomás Saraceno has created the Cloud Cities installation, which is currently on display at theHamburger Bahnhof Museum in Berlin, Germany.

 

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Visit Tomás Saraceno’s website – here.

Photography by Jens Ziehe and Tomás Saraceno

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Jaume Plensa @ YSP

YSPpresents an extraordinary body of new and recent work by renowned Spanish artist Jaume Plensa. Encouraging tactile and sensory exploration, this vibrant exhibition includes a 50-metre curtain of poetry made of suspended steel letters, large illuminated sculptures in the landscape, and engraved gongs that visitors can strike to fill the gallery with sound.

 

Irma

http://vimeo.com/22755074

 

yorkshire souls I, II and III'

 

Nuria & Irma 2010
 

Jaume Plensa

la llarga nit

house of knowledge

heart of trees

spiegal'


mike + doug starn: big bambu at the venice biennale


‘big bambú’ by mike and doug starn of starn studio, venice, italy
image © designboom

currently on display at the 54th venice biennale is ‘big bambú’, an evolutionary and complex structure by  american artists and brothers mike and doug starnpreviously installed on the roof of the metropolitan museum of art in new york  – where it ranked forth in the world for total attendance of a contemporary exhibition in 2010 –  the piece is being presented as an
official collateral exhibition, part of a special project by glasstress.  sculptural and experiential, the hollow bamboo structure features a spiraling and undulating trail which leads visitors to an expansive lounge fifty feet above the grand canal. meandering through the courtyard of casa artom next to the peggy guggenheim collection, the organic and woven maze remains in a state of constant flux, complete but never at rest. the artists, along with a crew of eleven rock climbers, will continue to lash together more than 3,000 bamboo poles, extending the pathway upwards and adding an additional
fifteen to twenty feet of height until the dismantling – expected to last two weeks – begins on june 18th.

See more of this crazy structure


anish kapoor: monumenta 2011 – leviathan

Sculpture as urban intervention or environment from designboom


image © designboom

monumenta 2011
‘leviathan’ by anish kapoor
grand palais, paris
may 11 to june 23rd, 2011

each year the french ministry of culture and communication invites a leading artist to create a work that responds to the exceptional architectural space of the grand palais in paris. the sheer monumental scale of the building provided the inspiration for a big idea: monumenta. this year, indian-born, british-based artist anish kapoor created a temporary, site-specific installation inside the nave of the glass-domed hall. the space was originally unveiled at the 1900 universal exhibition. for its fourth edition, after guest artists anselm kiefer, richard serra and christian boltanski, it has been the turn of anish kapoor to meet the challenge with a brand new work for the 13,500 m2 space.

‘it has been a slow process. it seems to me that I’ve been working on it since almost 20 years.
now it is here. we did it.’
says anish kapoor in an interview with designboom.
‘the sculpture is a total immersion in an unexplored physical and mental dimension. once you are inside,
in the giant 4-armed balloon, the involuted form  reminds you of an organic outer space and inner self at
the same time — but when you travel outside of it (once you are back in the space of the grand palais),
I hope the viewer has another encounter with the piece and with the luminosity thrown down by the glass roof.’


image © designboom
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